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Year : 2008  |  Volume : 40  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 251--255

Prescribing knowledge and skills of final year medical students in Nigeria

KA Oshikoya1, JA Bello2, EO Ayorinde2 
1 Department of Pharmacology, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos; Department of Paediatrics, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria
2 Department of Pharmacology, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
K A Oshikoya
Department of Pharmacology, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos; Department of Paediatrics, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Lagos
Nigeria

Objectives: To assess the knowledge of final year medical students in Nigeria, about good prescribing and the application of this knowledge to their prescribing skills. Materials and Methods: Thirty four final year medical students of the Lagos State University College of Medicine (LASUCOM), Ikeja, were interviewed with a structured questionnaire that assessed their knowledge on the principles of good prescribing. They were also requested to write a prescription, based on a paediatric clinical scenario of malaria and upper respiratory tract infection. The prescription was used to assess their prescribing skills. Results: Thirty one (91.18%) students knew that rational prescribing involved prescribing correct dosage of an appropriate medicine formulation. Factors considered important by the students to prescribe rationally were: Potential benefit : risk ratio of a medicine - 33 (97.06%); good knowledge of pharmacology - 29 (85.29%) and pathophysiology of the disease to be treated - 24 (70.59%); and safety of an alternative medicine to be used - 24 (70.59%). An average of 3.71 medicines was prescribed for a child suspected to have malaria. Antimalarials (38.24%) and paracetamol (20%) were the most frequently prescribed medicines. The name and signature of the prescriber were available in 51.61% and 58.06% prescriptions, respectively. Less than 50% prescriptions had the name, case file number, age and gender of the patient. Conclusion: The final year medical students of LASUCOM would require theoretical and practical teaching of principles of rational prescribing to improve their prescribing knowledge and skills.


How to cite this article:
Oshikoya K A, Bello J A, Ayorinde E O. Prescribing knowledge and skills of final year medical students in Nigeria.Indian J Pharmacol 2008;40:251-255


How to cite this URL:
Oshikoya K A, Bello J A, Ayorinde E O. Prescribing knowledge and skills of final year medical students in Nigeria. Indian J Pharmacol [serial online] 2008 [cited 2021 Oct 26 ];40:251-255
Available from: https://www.ijp-online.com/article.asp?issn=0253-7613;year=2008;volume=40;issue=6;spage=251;epage=255;aulast=Oshikoya;type=0