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Year : 2013  |  Volume : 45  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 429-433

Clinical pharmacology training in India: Status and need


1 National Chair in Clinical Pharmacology, Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), Govt. of India; Dean, ESI-GIMSR, MGM Hospital, Govt. of India, Parel, Mumbai, India
2 Senior Research Fellow (SRS) under National Chair in Clinical Pharmacology, ICMR, Parel, Mumbai, India
3 Head, Division of Basic Medical Sciences (BMS), Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), Government of India, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Nilima A Kshirsagar
National Chair in Clinical Pharmacology, Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), Govt. of India; Dean, ESI-GIMSR, MGM Hospital, Govt. of India, Parel, Mumbai
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0253-7613.117718

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Clinical pharmacologists undertake many tasks, and this makes defining a curriculum challenging. This is especially so under the changing circumstances in developing countries, where clinical pharmacology has an expanding role. The clinical pharmacologist may be responsible for conducting ethical clinical trials, supporting the needs of the generic drug industry, providing access to safe, effective and affordable medicines, guiding their rational use, achieving millennium development goals, and supervising medicines management standards for hospital accreditation. Clinical pharmacologists, including those in developing countries, have a great opportunity to contribute to public health and the growth of pharmaceutical industry, but at present, less clinical research is undertaken and fewer clinical trials are done than might be expected. Here we review clinical pharmacology training in India, consider the needs of different professionals contributing to clinical research and medicines utilization, and suggest ways in which current programs can be modified and new programs started. The conclusions are relevant to clinical pharmacology in both the developing and the developed world.






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