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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 42  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 189-191

Zidovudine-induced reversible pure red cell aplasia


1 Departments of Medicine and Pathology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India
2 Division of Medicine, Lyell McEwin Hospital, Elizabeth Vale, South Australia

Correspondence Address:
Rohith Valsalan
Division of Medicine, Lyell McEwin Hospital, Elizabeth Vale, South Australia

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0253-7613.66845

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Hematological abnormalities are frequent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and may be directly attributable to the virus or may be caused by opportunistic infections, neoplasms or drugs that cause bone marrow suppression or hemolysis. Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is an uncommon hematological disorder that causes anemia. We report a 37-year-old male with HIV infection who developed PRCA 6 weeks after commencing Zidovudine and recovered following cessation of the drug. This is the first case of Zidovudine-induced PRCA reported from the Indian subcontinent.






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